Child Poverty Monitor 2021 highlights persistent inequities in rates of child poverty

Source: Child Poverty Action Group

Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) welcomes the release of the Child Poverty Monitor today, which shows that prior to the Covid-19 pandemic, poverty reduction targets were largely on track for Pākehā children, however significant inequities remained for tamariki Māori, Pacific and disabled children.
Data collected prior to March 2020 shows that material hardship rates – defined as regularly going without six or more items deemed as ‘essential’ – were 1.7 times higher among tamariki Māori (19.5%), and over double the rate among Pacific children (26.7%), compared to the national average (11.3%).
“While progress towards child poverty targets may have been on course prior to the Covid-19 pandemic, it is crucial that no children are left behind,” says CPAG spokesperson Associate Professor Mike O'Brien. “Poverty denies children of opportunities both present and future, and the inequitable rates of hardship presented in this report suggest that we are systemically denying tamariki Māori and Pacific children opportunities to flourish.”
The report also reveals that disabled children, and children living in a household with at least one disabled person, have also been left behind in progress towards child poverty reduction targets. While the Government aimed to meet a target of 10.5% of children living in low-income households by 2020/21, the 2019/20 data presented in this report suggests that 15.6% of disabled children and children in a household with a disabled person, were living in poverty.-
“Living with disability means living with extra costs, and our welfare system must acknowledge that with adequate and accessible support,” says O’Brien. “We support the Children’s Commissioner’s call for increased financial assistance for families with a disabled caregiver or child, as was recommended in 2019 by the Welfare Expert Advisory Group.”
More broadly, CPAG advocates for more substantial increases to income support for families and whānau to ensure they can support their children without relying on emergency assistance such as food parcels.
“While this Government has made some positive changes, such as modest increases to benefit rates and increasing abatement thresholds, ultimately, for many families, incomes remain inadequate,” says O’Brien. “Increasing the disposable income of families and whānau is crucial to ensuring those in the deepest poverty are not left behind.”
This includes addressing the high cost of housing, but also ensuring comprehensive increases to income support, including to Working for Families tax credits.
“Despite recent eligibility changes, children in the deepest poverty are still denied access to a key family tax credit, the In-Work Tax Credit,” says O’Brien. “We urge the Government to use the upcoming Working for Families review to ensure that entrenched poverty is addressed for these children, rather than continuing to leave them further behind.”
-(As measured by households below 50% of median income, moving-line, before housing costs). 

Economy – Feedback sought on Deposit Takers Bill – Reserve Bank of New Zealand

Source: Reserve Bank of New Zealand

6 December 2021 – The Reserve Bank of New Zealand – Te Pūtea Matua is inviting feedback on the draft legislation for the proposed Deposit Takers Act.

The new Deposit Takers Act will create a single regulatory regime for all bank and non-bank deposit takers (NBDTs), such as building societies, credit unions and retail-funded finance companies). It will also introduce a new Depositor Compensation Scheme that will protect up to $100,000 per depositor, per licensed deposit taker, if a payout event is triggered.

Reserve Bank Governor Adrian Orr said this is a significant step towards strengthening the regulatory framework for all institutions that take deposits, and he encourages all stakeholders to share their views on the proposals.

“The new Act will broaden and clarify the scope of our role, which has evolved significantly since the Reserve Bank began prudentially regulating banks more than 30 years ago.”

The new legislation will require the RBNZ to:

establish deposit insurance (to be known as the Depositor Compensation Scheme) that will apply to all institutions that take eligible deposits;
introduce a single regulatory regime for NBDTs and banks, with standards as the main tool for us to set requirements;
strengthen director accountability with penalties for non-compliance;
broaden our supervision and enforcement tools (including a new power to conduct on-site inspections); and
strengthen and clarify the crisis resolution framework.

After the Act comes into force, there is likely to be a transition period to allow both the Reserve Bank and regulated entities time to prepare and adapt to the new regime.

We have worked closely with the Treasury and the Parliamentary Counsel Office to develop this draft legislation on the Minister of Finance's behalf.

Consultation on the exposure draft is open until 21 February 2022. During this period, we will be actively engaging stakeholders through a series of workshops and information sharing sessions.

The Depositor Compensation Scheme is being prioritised ahead of the rest of the Act coming into effect and is expected to be up and running in late 2023, around six months after the Deposit Takers Act is enacted.

More information

NZ on Air – Public Interest Journalism Fund (PIJF) boosts youth content, investigative journalism, current affairs and industry roles

Source: New Zealand on Air

6 December 2021 – Audience-focused content that meets the needs of tamariki and rangatahi, rural women and regional New Zealand is among a range of projects successful in the third round of Public Interest Journalism (PIJ) funding.

Also successful in this round are returning investigative journalism and current affairs series that continue to inform and engage the public about important issues.  

NZ On Air earmarked $9m for this funding round, the third drawn from the $55m Public Interest Journalism Fund announced in February 2021. Demand was high from a broad spectrum of media organisations, with 82 initial applications collectively seeking $29,135,469.

Head of Journalism Raewyn Rasch, Ngāi/Kai Tahu, says the assessment panel was particularly excited to see the standard of youth and tamariki projects seeking funding in this round.  

“It’s clear the sector sees the need to engage young people in news and current affairs, so they’re better informed about the world around them. It’s great to see their innovative approaches to reaching young audiences with quality information, especially through social media.”

In Round 3, 18 targeted role applications were recommended for total funding of up to $1,500,785.

Six organisations – Allied Press, Newshub, RNZ, Kōwhai Media, NZME and Stuff – will receive funding for roles that will strengthen company-wide cultural strategies. Ms Rasch says the assessment panel believe these roles, particularly the Partnership Editor positions, will bring positive change to how the media engage with Māori and diverse audiences.  

Other roles funded in this round include an audio innovation editor for NZME, to improve access to news for blind and low vision New Zealanders, and sub-editor roles at The Spinoff and Newsroom to lift the quality and output of public interest journalism content.

Stuff and NZME will both receive funding from Round 2 for existing roles to ensure that audiences continue to receive critical local news reporting on their communities. Stuff will receive $731,300 over two years to continue providing public interest journalism across the Marlborough region, while NZME will receive $940,188 over two years to retain reporting roles in its free community newspapers across Rotorua, Napier, Hastings, Whanganui, Manawatū, Taupō, Horowhenua, and Kapiti.
 
Twenty news and current affairs projects, which encompass children’s and youth news, investigative journalism, and high-quality current affairs will receive funding up to $7,753,648.

This includes six projects relating to tamariki and rangatahi news programmes, and strengthening student journalism. Other successful applications include investigations into New Zealand’s charity sector, the state of Aotearoa’s oceans, climate change and the legacy of abuse in State care.

The focus of improving journalistic standards also saw two on-the-job training projects with content outcomes approved for Allied Press and Māori Television.  

A group of returning series (Tagata Pasifika, Kea Kids News, The Hui, Q + A with Jack Tame, Newshub Nation, Stuff Circuit and Newsroom Investigates) have all been funded to return in 2022.  

Funding details

Roles (funded for one year)

Allied Press, 1 x Partnership Editor role, up to $145,650

Campus Radio 95bFM, 1 x Sub-Editor, up to $32,916  

Discovery NZ, 1 x Newshub Cultural Partnership Navigator, up to $130,500

GlobalHQ, 1 x Digital Editor, up to $105,000  

Kowhai Media Ltd, 1 x Kaiwhakatiki Hourua, up to $55,020

Mana Trust, 1 x Editor/Mentor and 1 x Digital Marketing Manager, up to $165,000

Newsroom NZ, 1 x Sub Editor, up to $91,679  

NZME, 1 x Kaupapa Editor and 1 x Audio Innovation role, up to $200,280  

Radio One 91FM, 1 x Digital Content Editor, up to $20,000

RNZ, 1 x Kurawhakaue Partnership Editor Role, up to $108,000

Stuff, 1 x te reo Māori Translator, up to $103,000  

Te Po, 1 x Kawea Te Rongo Kaiwhakahaere, up to $68,250  

The Spinoff, 1 x Sub Editor role, up to $105,450

The Pantograph Punch, 1 x Business Development role and 1 x Social Media Specialist (3 months), up to $95,040

Tikilounge Productions, 1 x Pasifika Youth Digital News Editor, up to $75,000

Projects
Allied Press, Cultural Competency and Commissioning project, 6 x long-form articles and staff training programmes, for Allied Press and associated publications, up to $61,725

BusinessDesk, Charity Sector Investigation (an in-depth investigation into New Zealand’s $18b charity sector), minimum 30 stories, up to $154,020

Discovery NZ, Newshub Nation 2022, 41 x 50 mins and a podcast series of current affairs, for Three, up to $978,175

Great Southern Television and Aotearoa Media Collective, The Hui, 40 x 28 mins shows and 40 x 28 mins podcasts Māori current affairs, for Three, up to $737,036

Kakalu Media, Online project (website creation and livestream capability) for Kakalu o Tonga, up to $9,817

Kowhai Media, A Voice for Tangaroa, 4 x 3000-word written features, 6 x 400-1,500 word stories that focus on the ocean around Aotearoa, New Zealand, for NZ Geographic, up to $146,745

Luke Nola & Friends, Kea Kids News, 80 x 4 mins videos for digital platforms and 80 x 2 mins videos for social media platforms, up to $653,773

Mahi Tahi Media, Ohinga 2, 50 x 4 mins videos, up to $264,386

Māori Television, Miria Te Pounamu (on-the-job journalism training wānanga for staff) for Māori Television, up to $189,200

Muster Vibrant Rural Communities, Rural Issues: Women’s perspectives on contemporary social and cultural issues, 9 x 3000 words, 72 x 600-1,500-word stories, 6 x 3 mins videos for Shepherdess Magazine platforms, up to $292,692

Newsroom NZ, Newsroom Investigates 2022, 60 mins video investigative current affairs, up to $336,358

Newsroom NZ, Climate Change Interview Series, 10 x 12 mins video interviews focused on how New Zealand will move to a low carbon future, up to $40,000

North & South Media, Exploring Aotearoa’s Chinese Communities, 4-6 features totaling 20,000 words exploring different facets of Chinese communities in New Zealand, up to $25,000

NZME, Whenua: Is it yours?, Interactive database and map, 4 x 1,500-3,000-word features that explores how and when land became part of the Pākehā property system in Aotearoa New Zealand), up to $80,500

Stuff, Stuff Circuit 2022, a minimum of 90 mins of video, investigative current affairs, up to $324,200

SunPix Tagata Pasifika, 51 x 23 mins and 2 x 90 mins Pasifika news and current affairs for TVNZ 1, up to $1,919,913

Te Parerē National Māori Students Magazine, 32 digital issues focused on Māori youth current affairs, up to $28,240

The Spinoff, The Quarter Million, 2 x 4,000 – 5,000-word feature, 8-10 Instagram tiles, 4 x 1,000-word stories plus 8 – 10 Instagram tiles, 4 x 2,000-word stories plus 8-10 Instagram tiles providing a youth perspective on the Royal Commission of Inquiry into Abuse in Care, up to $152,304

TVNZ, Kids Kōrero, 30 x 5 mins linear videos, 30 x 2 mins explainer videos, and 30 x 5 mins podcasts news and current affairs for 10 –14 year olds, up to $517,364

TVNZ, Q + A with Jack Tame 2022, 40 x 59 mins episodes, plus a two-hour special of current affairs, for TVNZ, up to $842,200  

Non-incremental Roles  

NZME, up to $940,188 over two years to support its newsgathering in Rotorua, Napier, Hastings, Whanganui, Manawatū, Taupō, Horowhenua, and Kapiti.

Stuff, up to $731,300 over two years for non-incremental role funding to support its Marlborough newsgathering.

Health Investigation – Patient medical warnings must be captured safely, report highlights

Source: Health and Disability Commissioner

Deputy Health and Disability Commissioner Vanessa Caldwell today released a report highlighting the importance of capturing patient medical warnings safely, after a man suffered an adverse reaction to radiography dye.
The man, in his eighties at the time of events, was diagnosed with cancer of the blood and bone marrow, and treated with chemotherapy. He required CT scans, which involved iodine contrasts. After the third scan, his GP recorded a reaction to iodine contract in the man’s Medical Warnings in the GP Practice Management System and this was provided with referrals to the District Health Board (DHB).
Although no breach of the Code of Health and Disability Services Consumers’ Rights was found in this case, the Deputy Commissioner found that the man’s adverse reaction to the contrast dye should have been added to the DHB’s systems in the first instance.
Dr Caldwell also noted that the man’s allergy was not entered on the National Medical Warning System by any health provider.
“The report highlights the importance of adequate communication between providers (in this case GP to DHB) to capture patient medical warnings safely,” said Dr Caldwell.
“There is an opportunity to align expectations and systems better across the primary and secondary sectors at a national level to improve the quality and safety of health services.”
Dr Caldwell will be writing to the Ministry of Health to request an update on progress on improvements to the National Medical Warning System.
She recommended that the DHB provide an update on its work to develop an interface between the GP e-referral system and the DHB’s radiology system, and consider whether there are additional measures the DHB can take to improve reconciling of GP e-referral medical warnings with its radiology system.

Health – Children with poorly controlled asthma at increased risk from COVID-19, study finds

Source: Asthma and Respiratory Foundation

A new study from Scotland shows that children with poorly controlled asthma are up to 6 times more likely to be hospitalised with COVID-19 compared to other children.
The study, published in The Lancet, looked at COVID infection and hospital admission in 750,000 school-age children.
Among 63,463 children (8.4%) with a diagnosis of asthma, 4,339 (6.8%) had a confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection, and 67 (1.5%) of these were admitted to hospital with COVID-19. There were nine intensive care admissions, including five deaths, in children with asthma. Children who had been admitted to hospital for asthma in the previous 2 years were 6 times more likely to be hospitalised with COVID-19 compared to children with no asthma.
These findings are significant, and the Asthma and Respiratory Foundation NZ (ARFNZ) is highlighting the importance of delivering education and resources to children so that they can keep their asthma well controlled. This is of crucial importance as COVID spreads through New Zealand, and children under 12 cannot yet be vaccinated.
“While most children with COVID-19 will experience mild symptoms, some are at increased risk of severe illness,” says respiratory paediatrician Dr David McNamara. “Initially we were told that children with lung disease were not at increased risk compared to other children, but this study shows that children with poorly controlled asthma are vulnerable. This suggests that children in this group should be prioritised for vaccination. All children with asthma should be assessed regularly to ensure they have good control, appropriate treatment and receive education to ensure adherence.”
“There is a high prevalence of childhood asthma in New Zealand, particularly among Māori tamariki and Pasifika children,” adds ARFNZ Clinical Director Dr James Fingleton. “As we’ve been seeing already, Māori and Pacific communities are particularly vulnerable to serious illness from COVID-19. This study shows that children with poorly controlled asthma are at increased risk of needing admission to hospital if they contract COVID-19, although the overall risk of needing hospital even in those with asthma was low. We need to ensure that we’re reaching these communities with vaccination for the recommended age groups and asthma resources. All children with asthma should have access to the tools to help them manage their asthma well and keep it under control.”
One in seven children take medication for asthma in New Zealand, with large numbers of children (305.9 per 100,000 in 2019) being admitted to hospital. Of those, the highest number of people being admitted to hospital with asthma are Māori, Pacific peoples and people living in the most deprived areas. Māori are 3 times and Pacific peoples 3.2 times more likely to be hospitalised than Europeans or other New Zealanders, and people living in the most deprived areas are almost 3 times more likely to be hospitalised than those in the least deprived areas.
The Asthma and Respiratory Foundation provides asthma education in schools through its Sailor the Pufferfish/Heremana Te Kōpūtōtara live shows, and the recently launched Sailor Digital Classroom. It also provides asthma resources and toolkits for children in a variety of languages, including English, te reo Māori, Samoan and Tongan. These free resources can be found at shop.asthmaandrespiratory.org.nz

Save the Children New Zealand Re: 2021 Child Poverty Monitor

Source: Save the Children

Save the Children New Zealand’s Advocacy and Research Director Jacqui Southey welcomed the findings of this year’s Child Poverty Monitor showing overall improvement in child poverty levels, but says more needs to be done to ensure every child in Aotearoa lives in a household with enough to thrive.
“Sadly, some groups of children are not seeing the same lift and are still too far behind their peers. The Government needs policies specific to Māori, Pasifika and disabled children to ensure they are not being left behind.
“Children with disabilities have the right to expect the same standards of living and opportunities as their non-disabled peers, it is essential we recognise these rights and do much better as a nation for our disabled children and their whānau.
“Ensuring every child lives in a family with an adequate income means they are likely to have improved school attendance and achievement, better health outcomes, and reduced food insecurity.
“Incomes that are too low have significant effects for children long term – poorer education outcomes and health status leading to reduced opportunities in their future. Every child has the right to a good life now and a bright future to look forward to.
“The impacts of these challenges will be felt in Aotearoa New Zealand well into the future if we don’t put in the effort to get it right for our kids now.”
Ms Southey says it was positive to see programmes such as food in schools making a difference for tamariki.
“We know that ensuring children have adequate nutrition will support their health and wellbeing, and contribute to their achievement at school in the short, and will benefit us all as a society through increased productivity in the future.
“When the spotlight is on poverty, positive change can be achieved. There is no reason that any child should be left behind due to poverty, and we urge the New Zealand Government to continue to invest in our tamariki that need greater support.”
Save the Children works in 120 countries across the world. The organisation responds to emergencies and works with children and their communities to ensure they survive, learn and are protected.
Save the Children NZ currently supports international programmes in Fiji, Cambodia, Bangladesh, Laos, Nepal, Indonesia, Thailand, and Mozambique. Areas of work include education and literacy, disaster risk reduction, and alleviating child poverty.

Child Poverty Monitor 2021 highlights persistent inequities in rates of child poverty

Source: Child Poverty Action Group

Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) welcomes the release of the Child Poverty Monitor today, which shows that prior to the Covid-19 pandemic, poverty reduction targets were largely on track for Pākehā children, however significant inequities remained for tamariki Māori, Pacific and disabled children.
Data collected prior to March 2020 shows that material hardship rates – defined as regularly going without six or more items deemed as ‘essential’ – were 1.7 times higher among tamariki Māori (19.5%), and over double the rate among Pacific children (26.7%), compared to the national average (11.3%).
“While progress towards child poverty targets may have been on course prior to the Covid-19 pandemic, it is crucial that no children are left behind,” says CPAG spokesperson Associate Professor Mike O'Brien. “Poverty denies children of opportunities both present and future, and the inequitable rates of hardship presented in this report suggest that we are systemically denying tamariki Māori and Pacific children opportunities to flourish.”
The report also reveals that disabled children, and children living in a household with at least one disabled person, have also been left behind in progress towards child poverty reduction targets. While the Government aimed to meet a target of 10.5% of children living in low-income households by 2020/21, the 2019/20 data presented in this report suggests that 15.6% of disabled children and children in a household with a disabled person, were living in poverty.-
“Living with disability means living with extra costs, and our welfare system must acknowledge that with adequate and accessible support,” says O’Brien. “We support the Children’s Commissioner’s call for increased financial assistance for families with a disabled caregiver or child, as was recommended in 2019 by the Welfare Expert Advisory Group.”
More broadly, CPAG advocates for more substantial increases to income support for families and whānau to ensure they can support their children without relying on emergency assistance such as food parcels.
“While this Government has made some positive changes, such as modest increases to benefit rates and increasing abatement thresholds, ultimately, for many families, incomes remain inadequate,” says O’Brien. “Increasing the disposable income of families and whānau is crucial to ensuring those in the deepest poverty are not left behind.”
This includes addressing the high cost of housing, but also ensuring comprehensive increases to income support, including to Working for Families tax credits.
“Despite recent eligibility changes, children in the deepest poverty are still denied access to a key family tax credit, the In-Work Tax Credit,” says O’Brien. “We urge the Government to use the upcoming Working for Families review to ensure that entrenched poverty is addressed for these children, rather than continuing to leave them further behind.”
-(As measured by households below 50% of median income, moving-line, before housing costs).

Finance Sector – NZ Green Investment Finance partners with NZ Post to accelerate EV transition

Source: NZ Green Investment Finance

New Zealand Green Investment Finance (NZGIF) and NZ Post have signed a $20 million financing agreement to accelerate the transition of the NZ Post fleet and its delivery contractors’ vehicles, to electric vans (E-Vans) or low emissions vehicles (LEVs).
NZGIF is providing financing of $10 million and NZ Post $10 million through NZGIF majority owned subsidiary Sustainable Fleet Finance (SFF) to provide attractive and competitive financing to improve access to E-Vans/LEVs.
This aligns with NZ Post’s continued work in climate action and leadership, through the transition of their fleet to LEVs. Its target is to have 100% of its own fleet and 25% of its contractor fleet electric by 2025 and the balance of the contractor fleet electric by 2030.
Contractors will also be able to access grant funding from NZ Post’s EV Incentive Scheme.
NZGIF Chief Executive Officer Craig Weise says that NZGIF is pleased to be supporting a recognisable corporate brand with an innovative financing solution to help their continued climate leadership.
“This is a great collaboration between like-minded organisations. NZ Post have committed to being carbon neutral from 2030 and the electrification of their fleet and the contractor fleet is pivotal to this.
Transport makes up about a fifth of the country’s carbon footprint, and most of that comes from the light vehicle fleet – cars, vans and utes. This deal will help our decarbonisation goals both by helping NZ Post achieve their goals but also by giving the second-hand commercial EV market the kickstart it needs,” Weise said.
This investment will initially be used to finance an order for 60 E-Vans for the NZ Post fleet.
These vans will arrive in New Zealand in the second half of 2022 and mark the beginning of a four-year tiered lease plan, where a vehicle leased by NZ Post can then be offered, by SFF, to contractors as second and third owners. The idea is, as a vehicle moves down the model it becomes more affordable for each subsequent owner.
Weise said ultimately switching to E-Vans for courier deliveries made sense because there are models available that are well suited to the task.
“Vehicles that will be available will meet pre-determined criteria from NZ Post to make sure they are fit for purpose. So, through this initiative we are bringing in a proven technology that hasn’t made it to New Zealand yet,” Weise said.
NZ Post Chief Executive Officer David Walsh says partnering with New Zealand Green Investment Finance aligns perfectly with its goal to be carbon neutral from 2030.
“We know that while an electric vehicle costs a lot less to run, the initial purchasing cost can be a barrier. Because of this, NZ Post is making up to half a million dollars available each year to help our delivery contractors invest in these eco-friendly vans.”
NZ Post is here for the long run, Walsh said.
“Sustainability is a big deal to all of us at NZ Post. We’re committed to our people and New Zealand communities and our sustainability goals are just another way of showing this.”
FAQ
What model of E-Vans will be used?
The initial order of 60 vehicles for NZ Post will be for the Mercedes eVito Panel Van. Discussions with other OEMs are also ongoing. All models that will be financed through this scheme will have met NZ Post operational requirements.
What EVs are currently in use by NZ Post?
NZ Post’s owned delivery fleet already includes over 400 electric vehicles – The Paxsters. There are also over 35 electric passenger cars. Over the last 24 months NZ Post has also been trialling Electric vans and understanding their use under operational conditions as well as implementation needs. This has included LDVs, Nissan and Renaults. We have used the information learnt during these trials to create short info videos for our contractors and these can be found here www.nzpost.co.nz/evan
How many vehicles are in the fleet?
The combined NZ Post and contractor fleet covers approximately 2,131 vehicles with 80% being light vans and 81% having diesel engines. There are approximately 1,916 vehicles in the contractor fleet.
What will the cost be?
Whilst the financing for the new project has been agreed, the leasing solutions to be offered to NZ Post contractors will be confirmed following a period of consultation with contractors to understand their needs and preferences in more detail.
Alongside a competitive finance offer, contractors will be able to apply for a support via NZ Post’s Electric Vehicle Incentive Programme.
What will the emissions reductions be?
The proposed NZ Post fleet transition plan is forecast to provide significant emissions benefits to New Zealand. Each diesel van we replace with an EV will abate an average of 7.8 tonnes of C02-e per annum
Comparing EVs to status quo ICE vehicles, each conversion will have a reduction in emissions by factors of around 90%. As New Zealand progresses towards 100% renewable generation, the reduction factor will increase further.
More about New Zealand Green Investment Finance
New Zealand Green Investment Finance is a green investment bank established by the New Zealand Government to accelerate investment that supports New Zealand’s low carbon future.
With a broad and flexible mandate, our investments can take many forms, from debt to equity, with the ability to take risk positions that help to attract co-investors.
Our investments are made on a commercial basis and we do not offer grants, subsidies or concessionary terms.
As a limited liability company independent of government, we make our own investment decisions, informed by a Board and team with expertise in investment, financial markets and sustainability.
NZGIF is not a registered bank.
More about Carbn Group
Carbn Group is a parent company of two distinct subsidiaries formed to support the uptake of low emissions vehicles in corporate and government-owned fleets.
The two companies – Carbn Asset Management (CAM) and Sustainable Fleet Finance (SFF) – operate independently to reduce New Zealand’s light vehicle fleet emissions, the country’s fastest growing emissions sector. CAM provides fleet optimisation and transition planning for fleet owners, while SFF provides financing for electric vehicles for fleets.
Carbn is significantly scaling up its fleet financing arm to finance further private corporate and government fleet transitions to EVs.
Carbn Group’s activities give a wide range of New Zealanders the opportunity to experience driving electric vehicles through work, thus helping to mainstream EV use. It will also help build the second-hand market for EVs in New Zealand.

Health – GPs receive international recognition for contribution to general practice

Source: Royal NZ College of General Practitioners

The Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners congratulates Professor Felicity Goodyear-Smith and Dr Jo Scott-Jones who have been awarded Fellowship of the World Organization of Family Doctors (WONCA).
These Fellowships were awarded (virtually) to Prof Goodyear-Smith and Dr Scott-Jones at WONCA’s recent 23rd World Conference of Family Doctors and highlighted their outstanding contributions to the College of GPs and the discipline of general practice on a local and international scale.
College President Dr Samantha Murton says, “Prof Goodyear-Smith and Dr Scott-Jones are two very deserving recipients of WONCA Fellowship. Their contributions to general practice span clinical, research and teaching, and they truly epitomise the characteristics of a GP. I am thrilled they have been internationally recognised for their achievements.” 
About Professor Goodyear-Smith
Prof Goodyear-Smith obtained College Fellowship in 1998 and in 2016 was awarded Distinguished Fellowship of the College.
She is a senior academic involved in teaching and research at the Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care in the School of Population Heath at The University of Auckland and is the founding Editor-in-Chief of the College’s peer-reviewed publication the Journal of Primary Health Care (JPHC).
Prof Goodyear-Smith has also worked in the UK, and in Jamaica. Whilst in Jamaica, she spent time working as a police medical officer as well as in obstetrics & gynaecology and family planning. Her expertise has been recognised with Fellowship in the Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine at The Royal College of Physicians.
Prof Goodyear-Smith’s research interest areas include international primary health care, including cross-country comparisons in low- and middle-income countries, screening and intervention for mental health and risky lifestyle behaviours, immunisation, and co-design and Pacific methodologies. She has been very involved in WONCA, chairing their Working Party on Research, and has co-edited three books ( International Perspectives on Primary Care Research, How to do Primary Care Research, and How to do Primary Care Educational Research) on WONCA’s behalf. 
About Dr Scott-Jones
Dr Scott-Jones obtained College Fellowship in 1999, and Fellowship of the Division of Rural Hospital Medicine in 2003. He was awarded the College’s Distinguished Service medal in 2007.
He is medical director for Pinnacle Midlands Health Network and has a GP practice in Ōpōtiki, and works as a GP across the Midlands region (which covers Gisborne, Taranaki, Rotorua, Taupō -Turangi, Thames-Coromandel and the Waikato).
One of the many successful initiatives developed and implemented by Dr Scott-Jones is ‘Rural Fest’. For the past six years, this annual cross-party event has brought together organisations in the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) to discuss issues around health and wellbeing in rural communities. These issues are taken to Parliament where meetings are held with party caucus and individual politicians to highlight them.
The mission of WONCA is to improve the quality of life of the peoples of the world through defining and promoting its values, including respect for universal human rights and including gender equity, and by fostering high standards of care in general practice/family medicine. Read more about the work of WONCA: globalfamilydoctor.com/  

Save the Children New Zealand Re: 2021 Child Poverty Monitor

Source: Save the Children

Save the Children New Zealand’s Advocacy and Research Director Jacqui Southey welcomed the findings of this year’s Child Poverty Monitor showing overall improvement in child poverty levels, but says more needs to be done to ensure every child in Aotearoa lives in a household with enough to thrive.
“Sadly, some groups of children are not seeing the same lift and are still too far behind their peers. The Government needs policies specific to Māori, Pasifika and disabled children to ensure they are not being left behind.
“Children with disabilities have the right to expect the same standards of living and opportunities as their non-disabled peers, it is essential we recognise these rights and do much better as a nation for our disabled children and their whānau.
“Ensuring every child lives in a family with an adequate income means they are likely to have improved school attendance and achievement, better health outcomes, and reduced food insecurity.
“Incomes that are too low have significant effects for children long term – poorer education outcomes and health status leading to reduced opportunities in their future. Every child has the right to a good life now and a bright future to look forward to.
“The impacts of these challenges will be felt in Aotearoa New Zealand well into the future if we don’t put in the effort to get it right for our kids now.”
Ms Southey says it was positive to see programmes such as food in schools making a difference for tamariki.
“We know that ensuring children have adequate nutrition will support their health and wellbeing, and contribute to their achievement at school in the short, and will benefit us all as a society through increased productivity in the future.
“When the spotlight is on poverty, positive change can be achieved. There is no reason that any child should be left behind due to poverty, and we urge the New Zealand Government to continue to invest in our tamariki that need greater support.”
Save the Children works in 120 countries across the world. The organisation responds to emergencies and works with children and their communities to ensure they survive, learn and are protected.
Save the Children NZ currently supports international programmes in Fiji, Cambodia, Bangladesh, Laos, Nepal, Indonesia, Thailand, and Mozambique. Areas of work include education and literacy, disaster risk reduction, and alleviating child poverty.