Pacific Health Issues – Pacific Health Plus sends medical volunteers to help with measles outbreak in Samoa

Source: Pacific Health Plus

In response to the measles crises in Samoa, Porirua-based primary health care provider, Pacific Health Plus, in a joint project with Pacific Cooperation Foundation, are sending two staff to assist medical teams in Samoa.

“This is Pacific Health Plus trying to do what we can for our Samoan brothers and sisters,” says John Fiso, chairman of Pacific Health Plus. “We wish Kailua Faafoi, our senior nurse, and Dr Penehuro Tapelu, our Samoan qualified doctor, all the very best with their courageous journey.”

“This is a tangible and direct way for Pacific Cooperation Foundation to support this tragedy,” says Nicole Metzger, Chair of Pacific Cooperation Foundation.
 
Kailua left for Samoa on 9th December to help administer measles vaccines, while Dr Tepelu will leave later in the week. They will be housed in Samoa with help from Rohit Reddy and the Tanoa Group.

Dr Tapelu previously worked at Tupua Tamasese Meaole Hospital in Apia and is currently working in public health outreach for Pacific Health Plus.

Kailua has worked in the health sector for 12 years. She is from Tokelau, a close neighbor of Samoa and is a passionate primary health care nurse working for Pacific Health Plus.

“We hope this will help relieve the clinical staff who are working tirelessly to administer MMR vaccines,” says Pacific Health Plus Director, Lee Pearce.

“It is a tragic situation in Samoa and sending qualified staff to help is an extension of what we do at Pacific Health Plus,” says Lee. “Our family is not just contained to Porirua, the people affected in Samoa are our family too.”

“It is not the first epidemic in recent times, but when it is in your own backyard it is a real wake-up call and shows the importance of public health and the need to increase the Public Health workforce regionally,” Lee says.

Samoa has been hit hard by a measles outbreak that has so far claimed the lives of 68 people, mainly children.

As of Sunday 8th December the Samoan government stated that 4,581 measles cases have been reported since the outbreak, with 121 recorded in the last 24 hours.

According to a tweet by the Samoan government on December 8th, the push to vaccinate citizens since the outbreak hit has so far lead to successful vaccinations of: 76% of infants and children aged 6 months to 4 years; 88% of children aged 5 to 19 years old; and 85% of women aged 20 to 35 years old.

But there is still more work to be done.

Notes:
Pacific Health Plus
Pacific Health Plus, based in Cannons Creek, Porirua, was established as a subsidiary of the Fiso Investment Group in January 2019. It was formerly known as Porirua Health Services (PHS) which had been operating for 10 years.

Sport and Recreation Sector Event reveals Auckland’s socio-economic gap driving participation down

Source: Aktive
The spotlight was on social inequality at the recent Sport and Recreation Sector Event 2019: Making Auckland the world’s most active city, with international benchmarking from Portas Consulting revealing that deprivation in Auckland affects participation more than in London, Stockholm and Singapore.
Hosted by Aktive, in association with strategic partners Sport New Zealand and Auckland Council, more than 120 leaders from 90 different sport, recreation, health and community organisations attended the event, which featured the latest Active Citizens Worldwide research from leading global management consultancy Portas Consulting.
This research shows that individuals from higher socio-economic backgrounds are more active through sport and active recreation, with Auckland however having the highest socio-economic gap of all Active Citizens Worldwide participating cities.
Aktive’s Chief Executive, Dr Sarah Sandley says addressing social inequalities is key to shifting the dial.
"The Active Citizens Worldwide research indicates that a there is a vast difference in socio-economic status across Auckland which impacts participation in sport and active recreation," says Dr Sandley. "We need to address this gap and ensure physical activity opportunities target low socio-economic communities in Tāmaki Makaurau."
Thomas Fleurot, Project Manager, Portas Consulting echoes this statement: "Through this research, we are laying the foundations to increase physical activity in Auckland by identifying crucial areas to focus efforts and resources."
The Sport and Recreation Sector Event featured a range of topics relevant to the sector including research and insights, case studies and focus areas for Tāmaki Makaurau.
"This annual event is an opportunity for those in the Auckland sport and recreation sector to connect and learn about new and innovative ways of engaging people across the region and increase physical activity," says Dr Sandley. "A major take-
out is that, as a sector, we must double down on the use of research and combine our scale and expertise to reach those who are underactive, community by community."
Attendees were addressed by distinguished guests including Mace Ward, General Manager Parks Sport & Recreation, Auckland Council; Peter Miskimmin, Chief Executive Officer, Sport New Zealand; Dr Sarah Sandley, Chief Executive, Aktive; and Thomas Fleurot, Project Manager, Portas Consulting, alongside sector speakers from organisations including Community Leisure Management, Parafed Auckland, Harbour Rugby and Squash Auckland.
Featuring the hashtag #GetAktiveAKL, Aktive tweeted and posted updates and messages communicated by speakers throughout the event. These included comments from Thomas Fleurot of Portas Consulting: ‘We identified areas of focus for the sector including the need to match provision to participants’ changing preferences, addressing the social inequalities of physical activity and encouraging workforce diversity’; and ‘We are far more than just competitive sport,’ from Peter Miskimmin.
Dr Sandley adds: "We also need leaders from diverse cultures so we can reach those who are underactive in their communities.
"Aktive is proud to help facilitate these valuable connections and we look forward to building on this with further opportunities to bring the sector together."
The Active Citizens Worldwide annual report can be found at http://activecitizens.world/2019-report

Transport Sector – Revolutionary approach to reducing harmful crashes on our roads

Source: EROAD

Innovative use of technology can now predict where road crashes may occur, enabling more efficient interventions. 

EROAD noticed that commercial vehicles with EROAD's Ehubo2 installed (originally to automate their Road User Charges and enable efficient vehicle fleet management) were also experiencing significant decreases in harsh braking or overspeed events.

These ambassadors for safety got the company's analytical engineers thinking.  Given those were readily accepted precursors to crashes, could the data be used to predict where crashes would occur, and importantly why? Did improving the safety on our roads have to continue using retrospective information, or could technology really predict the future?

The answer was a resounding yes. The technology developed by EROAD enabled an extensive anonymized and aggregated data set that could not just predict where crashes may occur, but also enabled insights as to what interventions could be considered. Most importantly they could measure the impact of those interventions much faster than before, in order to prevent more 'high crash areas' from occurring on our roads.

Gareth Robins, Director of Analytics at EROAD explained "The current intervention loop starts with a crash which gets investigated, followed by an average three years before the effectiveness of any interventions can be assessed. Our innovative approach identifies the precursor events (like harsh braking) as they occur, enabling interventions to be considered and their impact measured in a timely fashion that could prevent a crash occurring". 

At the Transport Knowledge Conference held in Wellington late last week, Gareth presented how the company had identified these areas on New Zealand roads and could measure the impact of any intervention put in place. He gave an example of how moving the placement of road signs could significantly reduce the crash precursors on that section of road. Fewer precursors means less crash harm.

It's not just New Zealand that is interested in this innovative solution to reduce serious injuries and fatalities on our roads. The International Road Federation (IRF) representing 118 countries, invited Gareth to present EROAD's revolutionary approach to the Road Safety Committee at the recent IRF symposium held in Las Vegas, Nevada. Interest was high resulting in the presentation being repeated for all members of the general assembly.

This latest research from EROAD continues the Dynamic Risk model the company released earlier this year, which enables transport authorities to move to a predictive programme of risk management and make efficient spending decisions that can improve road safety.

 

Links:   EROAD receives 2019 Global Road Achievement Award
Press Release on Dynamic Risk April 2019

 

 

About EROAD

  • EROAD believes every community deserves safer roads that can be sustainably funded. This is why EROAD develops technology solutions (products and services) that manage vehicle fleets, support regulatory compliance, improve driver safety and reduce the costs associated with driving.  EROAD also provides valuable insights and data analytics to universities, government agencies and others who research, trial and evaluate future transport networks. This data enables those who use the roads to influence the design, management and funding of future transport networks.
  • EROAD launched with the purpose of modernizing New Zealand's paper-based road user charging system. By 2009 EROAD had introduced the world's first nationwide electronic road user charging system and now around 46% of collected heavy vehicle road user charges in New Zealand are being collected using EROAD technology. By March 2019, this had delivered NZ$2.5B to NZTA for the sustainability of the NZ transport network. In the USA, EROAD introduced the first electronic Weight Mile Tax service (2014) and the first independently verified Electronic Logging Device service (2017).
  • EROAD (ERD) is listed on the NZX, and employs almost 300 staff located across NZ, Australia and North America.

Social Issues – 2019 Child Poverty Monitor: There’s more to be done to help children in need

Source: Child Poverty Action Group
Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) welcomes the 2019 Child Poverty Monitor report, and says more can be done to help families who have need of welfare assistance.
Findings of the report include that 174,000 children in New Zealand live in households that aren’t always able to have enough healthy food, 148,000 children live in households experiencing material hardship, and 56% of children living in households who receive financial assistance don’t always have enough healthy food.
"There have been valuable initiatives to support children in low-income households, but for those worst-off, we can do much more," says Professor Innes Asher, CPAG’s Health advisor. "We need an urgent plan to address the recommendations made by the Government-appointed Welfare Expert Advisory Group, to restore wellbeing and opportunity for the vast number of children who are living in deeply entrenched poverty, here in the land of plenty.
"Right now the Government’s books look very good. It is absolutely possible to transform our nation so that Aotearoa can be the best place to be a child and young person. In particular we need a strategy to address improving the lives of children whose families are struggling with such high housing costs that they cannot afford enough healthy food."
"The figures in the report correlate to the number of children living in households who have less than 40% of the national equivalised median income – after housing costs have been accounted for," says Professor Asher. "Many, if not all of those children will be living in households supported by a welfare benefit."
The Government’s Families Package will help an estimated 384,000 families by an average of $75 per week by 2021, however families on benefits need much more than this, says CPAG.
"These families need anywhere between $100-$300 more each week, depending on their composition, just to make ends meet," says Professor Asher.
"Their children are at risk of long-term physical and mental health problems, which can drastically affect their life chances," says Professor Asher. "For these children to have good lives, we need to act now to ensure that they are healthy, their families aren’t impacted by the constant stress of just trying to survive, and that they can get the best out of their education."
The Child Poverty Monitor reports that over 30% of families on the lowest incomes are spending more than half their incomes on housing.
"If we improve incomes and provide more affordable housing options, then we remove the constraints that keep parents from being able to make healthy choices. Their lives will be vastly better, and their children will do well," says Asher. "When insecure and unsafe housing situations persist for children throughout childhood, their whole lives can be affected thereafter. We are hearing that many struggling young adults who don’t have a permanent address have never had one. Safe, secure housing is vital for children’s outcomes."
The Government has promised to index benefits and thresholds for earned income in line with minimum wage inflation from next year. But CPAG says that benefit levels and thresholds must be lifted substantially for future indexation to make a real difference. Moreover all parts of Working for Families are not being indexed in this way, and they must be as well.
CPAG says that the Government could make every family living in hardship and receiving welfare assistance at least $72.50 better off each week if it removed the discriminatory in-work eligibility test. This could be enacted with minimal administrative change, and it is very affordable at a cost of around $0.5billion per year.
"Taking away the hours of paid work eligibility test would make many more families able to put food on the table, and it would benefit children in sole parent households the way it currently benefits children in two-parent homes," says Professor Asher.
CPAG says that the Government must urgently address housing need.
"We agree with the Children’s Commissioner Judge Andrew Becroft that the Government must build and acquire many more houses into state and social housing programmes so that all children live in safe, healthy and long-term housing."
These bold steps are needed to enable New Zealand to realise its vision to be the best place in the world for children and young people.
 include that 174,000 children in New Zealand live in households that aren’t always able to have enough healthy food, 148,000 children live in households experiencing material hardship, and 56% of children living in households who receive financial assistance don’t always have enough healthy food.
"There have been valuable initiatives to support children in low-income households, but for those worst-off, we can do much more," says Professor Innes Asher, CPAG’s Health advisor. "We need an urgent plan to address the recommendations made by the Government-appointed Welfare Expert Advisory Group, to restore wellbeing and opportunity for the vast number of children who are living in deeply entrenched poverty, here in the land of plenty.
"Right now the Government’s books look very good. It is absolutely possible to transform our nation so that Aotearoa can be the best place to be a child and young person. In particular we need a strategy to address improving the lives of children whose families are struggling with such high housing costs that they cannot afford enough healthy food."
"The figures in the report correlate to the number of children living in households who have less than 40% of the national equivalised median income – after housing costs have been accounted for," says Professor Asher. "Many, if not all of those children will be living in households supported by a welfare benefit."
The Government’s Families Package will help an estimated 384,000 families by an average of $75 per week by 2021, however families on benefits need much more than this, says CPAG.
"These families need anywhere between $100-$300 more each week, depending on their composition, just to make ends meet," says Professor Asher.
"Their children are at risk of long-term physical and mental health problems, which can drastically affect their life chances," says Professor Asher. "For these children to have good lives, we need to act now to ensure that they are healthy, their families aren’t impacted by the constant stress of just trying to survive, and that they can get the best out of their education."
The Child Poverty Monitor reports that over 30% of families on the lowest incomes are spending more than half their incomes on housing.
"If we improve incomes and provide more affordable housing options, then we remove the constraints that keep parents from being able to make healthy choices. Their lives will be vastly better, and their children will do well," says Asher. "When insecure and unsafe housing situations persist for children throughout childhood, their whole lives can be affected thereafter. We are hearing that many struggling young adults who don’t have a permanent address have never had one. Safe, secure housing is vital for children’s outcomes."
The Government has promised to index benefits and thresholds for earned income in line with minimum wage inflation from next year. But CPAG says that benefit levels and thresholds must be lifted substantially for future indexation to make a real difference. Moreover all parts of Working for Families are not being indexed in this way, and they must be as well.
CPAG says that the Government could make every family living in hardship and receiving welfare assistance at least $72.50 better off each week if it removed the discriminatory in-work eligibility test. This could be enacted with minimal administrative change, and it is very affordable at a cost of around $0.5billion per year.
"Taking away the hours of paid work eligibility test would make many more families able to put food on the table, and it would benefit children in sole parent households the way it currently benefits children in two-parent homes," says Professor Asher.
CPAG says that the Government must urgently address housing need.
"We agree with the Children’s Commissioner Judge Andrew Becroft that the Government must build and acquire many more houses into state and social housing programmes so that all children live in safe, healthy and long-term housing."
These bold steps are needed to enable New Zealand to realise its vision to be the best place in the world for children and young people.

Health Sector – Incident management by disability support service

Source: Health and Disability Commissioner
Deputy Health and Disability Commissioner Rose Wall today released a report finding a disability support service in breach of the Code of Health and Disability Services Consumers’ Rights (the Code) for failing to appropriately support staff to manage an incident with a woman in its care.
The woman has an intellectual disability and was under a compulsory care order. She had a history of being verbally abusive, destructive and violent and was receiving full time care in a secure unit run by the disability service.
Due to the woman’s history, there were plans in place to manage her when she was in a heightened state. Those plans involved giving the woman space to calm down and avoiding physical contact, as touching triggered her.
On the day in question, the woman’s behaviour and mood deteriorated and she entered the staff office, threw herself on the floor twice and grabbed, pulled and threw objects around the office. A support worker removed her from the office using physical contact.
While Ms Wall was critical of the support worker’s actions, she considered that the disability service failed to provide adequate induction and training when the support worker was first employed less than two months prior to the incident.
"I am thoughtful of the very specialised service that is being provided to [the woman] (such as that she is the sole client), and would expect that training and support for all staff reflected this level of specialisation," Ms Wall said.
Ms Wall was also critical of the failure to inform the woman’s welfare guardian of the incident, and staff’s lack of clarity on when incidents needed to be reported.
Following recommendations from the HDC, the disability service has since improved its training for staff and incident reporting. Rose Wall recommended that both the support worker and the disability service apologise to the woman.
The full report for case 17HDC00439 is available on the HDC website.

Education Sector – Nursing students promote health careers to curtail rural health crisis

Source: Whitireia

New Zealand’s health sector is nearing a service delivery crisis, and the already struggling rural areas could be the worst hit if more nurses and doctors are not trained up to work in rural practices.

Part of solving this problem is encouraging school students in rural New Zealand to consider medical and health careers.

To help this cause and inspire school students, a group of third-year nursing students from Whitireia in Wellington, joined a tour of rural schools in the lower North Island to talk about why they, as young people, have chosen nursing as a career.

The programme of rural visits was arranged by the New Zealand Rural General Practice Network (NZRGPN) who partner with tertiary health students to promote health and medical careers to school students in rural New Zealand. Tertiary students on the tours are often members of Students of Rural Health Aotearoa – New Zealand’s only rural health student network.

“This was the first time that we have been asked to participate in this tour,” says Leanne Pool, Programme Manager, Nursing at Whitireia. “It was a fantastic opportunity for our students to promote nursing as a career choice to young people.”
 
Students, Rachael Rowe, Lagisi Wirangi, Katrin Scott, Laura Winter and Mickey Walker travelled over five days all the way up from where their campus is in Wellington, through the Wairarapa, Central Hawkes Bay, to Napier and back again on the tour.
 
“We already had medical students join us but we really wanted some nursing students to come along too,” says Esther Maxim, Rural Health Careers Programme Manager for the New Zealand Rural General Practice Network (NZRGPN) “and that is why we contacted Whitireia. It is also a great way to strengthen our relationship with Whitireia.”

“Young people are a lot better at engaging with other young people, they understand the challenges or confusion school students often face in terms of choosing a career, so that is why we chose tertiary students to visit the rural schools to encourage the pupils to complete their secondary education and hopefully pursue one of the many rewarding careers in rural health,” said Esther.

"Statistics suggest that the most effective time to talk to kids about their career option is prior to Year 10," says Esther.

Whitireia nursing student, who joined the tour, Lagisi Wirangi is a prime example of this. “I’ve known that I wanted to be a nurse since I was 14 years old. My Grandmother was sick so I spent a lot of time with her in the hospital and in that time I saw firsthand how truly important nurses are.”

Rachael Rowe from Whitireia also on the tour explained that a big part of what they were doing was explaining to the school students the different pathways available to a career as a health practitioner. “I think often young people do not seek a career in health because they think their marks are not good enough. But there are so many ways to train nowadays and it’s not all about studying for years at university to be a doctor.”

Although the tertiary students were there to teach the rural school pupils about their career options, they were learning a lot themselves.

“I spent my childhood driving up north to Gisborne but we never really stopped in the small towns on the way,” explained Lagisi, “it was really surprising to me how isolated so many of the rural towns are in New Zealand. I had always seen it driving past but never stopped to consider what that isolation really means for the people living in those towns.”

“After speaking to the students, we also spent a bit of time going to local hospitals and health facilities and it was really eye opening to see what they were working with” explained Rachael.

“Not only were they under-staffed, but the medical centres often provide care to a huge catchment area so it can take hours to get to a centre to get care. This means that a lot of people only seek care when their condition becomes severe, which can be very dangerous. It also leaves the community feeling very isolated.”

While the issue of mental health was not raised by the students, it was a big part of what was discussed when Rachael and Lagisi went to the rural medical centres.

“We know that the highest rates of suicide in New Zealand are among men in rural areas, so it was shocking to me, as someone who is going into mental health nursing, just how ill-equipped the rural areas are to help these men” explained Racheal. “This is something that I am really passionate about, so I really want to do another road trip where we purely discuss nursing and mental health!”

Business Announcements – BusinessNZ President re-elected

Source: BusinessNZ
Wellington businessman Vaughan Renner has been re-elected BusinessNZ President at BusinessNZ’s Annual General Meeting.
Andrew Hunt, President of EMA, and Andrew Leys, President of the Otago Southland Employers Association have been re-elected as BusinessNZ Vice-Presidents.
BusinessNZ Council members are David Welsh (Auckland), Jugdis Parbhu (Auckland), Margaret Gracie (Auckland), Sara Lunam (Tauranga), Adele Rose (Hastings), Jo Healey (Wellington), Andrew Logie (Christchurch) and Benjamin Badger (Christchurch).

Wine Sector – Health-Conscious Millennials Driving Growth of Organic ‘Bio Wines’

Source: Impact PR

Health-conscious millennials are behind the rapid growth in organic, sustainable and vegan suitable wines, and more needs to be done to foster this market as demand for traditional NZ wine plateaus, according to industry experts.

Data from liquor retail chain The Trusts West Auckland shows a 45% sales lift in naturally produced or organic wines over the past 12 months alone. Figures from the same period suggest an otherwise flat traditional wine market – with only 3% growth last year.

The Trusts hospitality development manager Jenny Mukerji says globally the organic wine category is growing even faster with estimates suggesting consumption will reach 1 billion bottles per annum by 2022.

Mukerji says one in every 20 bottles sold in their stores is organic, sustainable or vegan and while growing across all age groups, they are particularly popular with millennials looking for wines which are aligned with their health and environmental philosophies.

She says there is a diverse range of niche wines and subcategories emerging to cater to this new market.

“In addition to the organic wines which have been certified as made from grapes grown without chemical additives, we also have ‘natural wines’ which are fermented without commercial yeast and or chemicals. There are also new biodynamic wines which are grown under a set of holistic biodynamic principles and practices that regard the whole vineyard as one big living organism.

“Similarly, sustainable wines are governed by production practices that are ecologically responsible and economically viable.

“There are also vegan wines which are free from contact with any animal products during production, such as gelatin or egg white sometimes used in the fining process which softens the wine,” she says.

Professional sommelier Valentina Verardo says that the production of organic wines has become more mainstream now.

“With more customers looking for low-sulphite wines – a component which some people can react to, wineries that were previously not producing organic wines are converting their vineyards or adding an organic wine to their portfolio,” she says.

Mike Farrugia managing director of RM Wine Partners says their growth figures in the imported organic, vegan-friendly and preservative-free wine categories mirror that of the Trusts and says it is a result of an increase in consumer awareness of how a wine’s origins impact its taste.

“Organic vignerons need to care more about the vines and the vineyards, they protect it naturally from mildew and they are more particular with harvest timings.

“There have been very good studies showing that overall, organic grapes tend to have lower yields, which gives you a better grape with more concentrated flavour and, thus, a better wine,” he says.

Mukerji says the growth in the category represents a significant export opportunity for Kiwi winemakers as the traditional wine market begins to plateau.

“Local vineyards are producing some excellent innovative products and it is becoming increasingly important for them to understand the millennial segment who have reduced their consumption in other parts of the market.

“We are encouraging them to continue to invest in these categories to support both the domestic and the international markets,” she says.

Mukerji says more needs to be done at an industry level to better define the terminology and certifications used in describing these emerging niches – helping to ensure consumers have a credible and consistent point of reference for product choices.

Transport – End the Christmas suspensions: Hundreds of bus drivers to protest at Auckland Transport

Source: First Union
WHAT:
Hundreds of NZ Bus drivers suspended by their employer over Christmas for a non-disruptive free fares protest will be demonstrating outside Auckland Transport’s office, calling for an intervention to fix Auckland’s broken bus system and get drivers back on the road.
WHERE:
Outside Auckland Transport, 20 Viaduct Harbour Avenue (off Halsey Street & Fanshawe Street), Westhaven, Auckland
WHEN:
08:30am, Monday 9th December 2019
WHY:
Over 800 FIRST Union and Tramways Union members have been taking partial strike action over the last week by refusing to collect passenger fares, which drivers had chosen as a non-disruptive protest after rejecting NZ Bus’s last offer.
On Friday, drivers delivered notice of their intention to continue the free fares protest through to Christmas Eve, similarly to their colleagues at Go Bus, who are also locked in a long-running dispute over wages and conditions with their employer.
NZ Bus’s response, received on Friday, was to suspend their entire unionised workforce, cancel all major bus services during the Christmas rush, and attempt to blame drivers for the suspension and thus the cancelled services.
Jared Abbott, FIRST Union Secretary for Transport, Logistics and Manufacturing, said that while drivers are frustrated and shocked by the heavy-handed suspensions, they would not be cowed and were taking their protest to Auckland Transport, who contract NZ Bus as service provider for urban bus routes:
"Let me be absolutely clear: drivers opted for a clean protest that kept the buses running and the public informed on why they were striking – NZ Bus and Auckland Transport are the ones who’ve made the decision to cancel services during the busiest period of the year," said Mr Abbott.
"Auckland Transport have been aware of the crisis occurring in the bus industry for years – the issues in dispute are not new. It seems like the wheels of bureaucracy only start moving when we are taking industrial action of some sort, and as soon as we take our foot off the pedal, nothing happens."
"Despite what the company are saying, we are seeking a fair pay rate for all hours worked and a reduction of the unpaid book-off time. Currently drivers start work in the morning and can finish 12 hours later having not even made the equivalent of minimum wage – that’s not fair."
"The public are welcome to join us – these are your buses."

Shows – BOY & BEAR – Suck on Light New Zealand Tour 2020

Source: LiveNation

AUCKLAND, NZ (Dec 9, 2019) – Australian indie-folk band BOY & BEAR make their glorious and highly-anticipated return to New Zealand in support of their latest album, Suck on Light. The five-piece embark on a tour across the country hitting Wellington's Hunter Lounge on April 16, Auckland's Powerstation on April 17 and finishing in Christchurch at the James Hay Theatre on April 18.
 
Tickets for all shows go on sale at 11am Friday December 13.
 
Vodafone customers have first access to tickets through a pre-sale beginning 10am Tuesday December 9 until 10am Thursday December 12 at vodafone.co.nz/music.
 
My Live Nation members may also secure tickets first during the pre-sale beginning 10am Thursday December 12 until 10am Friday December 13.
 
For complete tour and ticket information, visit: livenation.co.nz.
 
After the most tumultuous period of their lives both personally and professionally, Boy & Bear are back with another national tour.
 
The band's position in the music industry was firmly cemented in 2011 after their debut album Moonfire reached platinum, won Boy & Bear five ARIA awards and saw three songs make it to triple j's Hottest 100 of 2011. Two years later came the release of their highly anticipated sophomore album Harlequin Dream, which debuted at #1 on the ARIA Albums Chart, spent five consecutive weeks in the top 10 and has since gone Platinum.
 
In October 2015 Boy & Bear put out Limit Of Love, debuting at #1 on the ARIA Albums Chart, making it their second consecutive number one debut. Following the release of their newest album Suck on Light, the band embarked on a massive North American tour, playing packed theatres across the US and Canada. Having now returned home, the boys are excited to share their new album with audiences across Australia and NZ in 2020.

BOY & BEAR
NEW ZEALAND 2020

HUNTER LOUNGE, WELLINGTON (18+)
THURSDAY APRIL 16

POWERSTATION, AUCKLAND
FRIDAY APRIL 17

JAMES HAY THEATRE, CHRISTCHURCH
SATURDAY APRIL 18

TICKETS ON SALE 11AM MONDAY DECEMBER 13
Vodafone pre-sale: 10am Tuesday December 10 until 10am Thursday December 12
Live Nation pre-sale: 10am Thursday December 12 until 10am Friday December 13

 
For complete tour and ticket information, visit: boyandbear.com & livenation.co.nz